Archive for the ‘Safety’ Category

changing lights

Friday, January 6th, 2017

Most people look at traffic signals every day, but don’t notice how they’re configured, or why they’re installed the way they are. Traffic signals change quite a bit with our construction projects, and not just from green to yellow to red.

Once a project is underway, each intersection in the construction area receives a new, temporary traffic signal pole on each corner, set farther back from the road. Then temporary traffic signals are strung on wires across the intersection from these temporary poles.

Once the temporary poles are in place, the old poles and signals are removed, including any poles in the centre median in each direction.

Having the temporary poles farther back from the road allows access for relocating utilities and widening the road. As lanes are shifted and the road is widened, the temporary signals are adjusted along the wires to ensure they’re in the correct place for traffic and pedestrians.

Later in the project, new poles are installed in their final location, and permanent traffic signals are added, along with a dedicated left/U-turn signal.

Each time the traffic signals are changed, paid-duty police officers are on hand at each intersection for a few hours to ensure traffic flows safely through the intersection. If you’re on Yonge Street in Newmarket or Bathurst and Centre Streets in Vaughan, you’ve seen this firsthand recently.

For a peek at the final outcome, check out the sections of rapidway on Highway 7 East in Markham and Davis Drive in Newmarket.

Despite the cold weather, the vivaNext team continues to work out on the corridors and behind the scenes – making progress as seamlessly as possible.

 

let it snow!

Friday, December 9th, 2016

Brrrr…..Winter decided to make an entrance this week! With the arrival of snow, our project teams put their winter maintenance plans into action.

With a bit of hard work and planning, the teams will ensure that our construction corridors are routinely maintained over the winter months to make sure everything is safe and secure, and that there is clear and easy access.

When our rapidway projects are in the construction phase, care and control of the corridor is transferred from York Region over to our constructor, but they need a little help maintaining the roads and sidewalks during the winter months.

They rely on our local municipalities [Vaughan, Richmond Hill and Newmarket] to assist with snow and ice clearing on the sidewalks, as well as York Region’s Roads branch to maintain the roadways.

With their specialized equipment and around-the-clock maintenance crews, the Municipalities and the Region are better equipped to handle whatever Mother Nature throws at us.

Before our teams can put their winter maintenance plans into action, we need to ensure that our construction corridors meet minimal maintenance standards. Traffic lanes and sidewalks are inspected to make sure they are wide enough to accommodate snow clearing machinery.

All sidewalks must be cleaned and potholes filled. Traffic barrels are inspected and cleaned so that they are visible at night.

Even though snow continues to fall outside, our construction crews will continue to work at building the rapidways in Newmarket, Richmond Hill and Vaughan.  Stay up-to-date on work in your area by subscribing to our updates. Happy shoveling!

 

working day and night

Wednesday, November 16th, 2016

Those living and working in York Region know firsthand about dealing with construction. During prime construction season, you typically see worksites on a number of Regional roads. We need these road improvements to ensure our fast-growing communities are connected by a strong transportation system.

So how do we get these projects done when people still need to use the roads?

VivaNext rapid transit projects are carefully planned to manage construction and maintain traffic flow. There is a balance on every construction project between the need to get work done on schedule, the need to keep traffic moving, and the construction disruption to adjacent homes and businesses.

On occasion, night work is scheduled on busy roads such as Highway 7 or Yonge Street to avoid traffic congestion during the higher-traffic daytime hours. For example, on Yonge Street between Weldrick Road and 16th Avenue, there is up to eight times more traffic during the day than during the overnight hours.

We understand that sitting in traffic can make commutes longer. On the other hand, when work is done at night we know the noise and lights can make it difficult for those living nearby. The project still needs to be completed, so we move forward, trying to strike a balance – with over 99% of the four-year project being done during the day. Work is limited during peak traffic times, and crews work diligently to complete overnight work quickly so that it’s over as soon as possible.

We know that a good night’s sleep is important, and our crews try to minimize the amount of noise and light they create while they’re working overnight.

Day or night, it helps to know what’s coming so you can plan around it. You can sign up for email notices at vivanext.com/subscribe. Thank you for your patience and understanding.

digging deep >> utilities at a glance

Wednesday, August 3rd, 2016

digging deep >> utilities at a glance

Before we can build dedicated rapid transit lanes, wider sidewalks, and plant beautiful greenery above ground, we need to go underground – to the world of utilities.

Our latest video peels back the layers to reveal all the modern conveniences we all depend on and often take for granted. We’ll shed some light on the steps we take to relocate critical infrastructure and explain why you see different crews come back to the same location as work progresses.

The most common things you’ll find are storm and sanitary sewers and pipes, water mains, gas mains, electrical wires, television/internet cables and phone lines.

We also take a look at the latest technology under the median and sidewalk planters , allowing trees and other plants to have deep, healthy root systems, and providing natural storm water management.

We’re just scratching the surface, but you’ll get a glimpse of how we replace and update infrastructure as an important investment that improves everyone’s quality of life.

 

navigating the rapidways

Friday, June 10th, 2016

click here to see the video -- rapidway intersections: safe journeys

Safety on the rapidway is everyone’s responsibility, and at vivaNext, we take it seriously. But that doesn’t mean we can’t look at an important topic in a light hearted way. You’ll need to watch our latest safety video to fully understand what we mean, but one thing is certain: you’ll be able to relate to one of our four travellers as they navigate our roads with Viva rapidways.

Motorist Molly, for example, needs to get to her mid-block destination, but gets stuck waiting for a left turn signal. What could be causing the problem?

Cyclist Cedric also has a turning concern while on the move. When travelling on dedicated bike lanes, making a left turn can be tricky business. Must he merge into dangerous traffic to get to the left turn traffic lane? Or is there an easier way?

Pedestrian Percy and his grandfather need to be fully aware of their surroundings when crossing the street, whether it’s to the vivastation in the centre lanes, or continuing to the other side.

However you get around, it’s important to understand what everyone else is doing to make sure your journey is a safe one. Watch the video, get to know the new surroundings, and take care when you’re travelling. Davis Drive and Highway 7 now have new ways to navigate, and there’s more to come!

 

green space = safe space

Wednesday, April 20th, 2016

green space = safe space

We’ve seen reports that support why having greenery around us can increase prosperity, improve health, and now new research says it makes the surrounding area safer.

It’s not so much the trees and shrubs themselves that keep people safe. Having an attractive space attracts people to spend time in the area – and puts more ‘eyes on the streets.’ And green space that appears cared for lets everyone know that someone owns, uses and maintains it. In the case of streets, it’s a sense of community ownership.

Well-maintained green spaces are thought to give an abstract sense of social order, and according to a community greenery experiment in Youngstown, Ohio, the safety and order extends to the surrounding area. There are all types of crime, and you can’t always predict where it will happen, but the pride of place on display with a nice park or streetscape seems to bring about positive behavior.

It’s exciting to see the trees along the Highway 7 East rapidway growing another season of new leaves, and people out enjoying the spring weather on the new sidewalks. We’re looking forward to planting trees this year on Davis Drive in Newmarket and on Highway 7 West in Vaughan.

So trees aren’t just trees. They, and their team of shrubs and grasses encourage health and wealth, and they fight crime in their spare time.

 

rapidways >> who goes there?

Wednesday, March 23rd, 2016

rapidways >> who goes there?

We have rapidways open on Highway 7 East, and on Davis Drive, and most people who live and work near these new rapid transit routes know who has access to the rapidways – buses! In fact, the rapidways are paved in red and painted with “bus only” to prevent others from accidentally entering the lanes.

There are a few others who are allowed to drive in the rapidway lanes. Ambulances, fire engines and police cruisers are permitted in an emergency to get past traffic quickly and safely. This is an added benefit that the rapidways bring to each community – saving valuable time when it’s truly needed.

Vehicles such as snow plows and street cleaners maintain the rapidways as needed. Maintenance and security staff from YRT/Viva operations and their contractor, TOK Transit, also access the rapidway stations and their marked vehicles may be seen at the far end of a station platform. This part of the platform is ramped on one side for their use – but this ramp should never be used by regular traffic to cross the rapidway.

Pedestrians and cyclists have access to any vivastation via the traffic signals and crosswalk, but should never jaywalk or cycle across or along rapidway lanes. To do this is risky because it’s unexpected and distracting to both Viva operators and drivers in regular traffic. And although we fully support active and alternative modes of travel, you also can’t travel the rapidway lanes in a scooter or wheelchair, skateboard, motorcycle, hoverboard, segway, golf cart, unicycle… or any other interesting mode of transportation we haven’t thought of yet!

You may wonder why Viva buses use the rapidways, but YRT buses don’t. The reason is that YRT buses either need to turn on and off the road frequently to gather customers, or their purpose is different – e.g., more stops, turning into shopping plazas, etc. Viva and YRT routes are evaluated by YRT/Viva’s Service Planning branch on a regular basis, and service changes are made to routes and schedules as needed.

A street that includes a rapidway is a complete street, with space for doing everything in a safe and efficient way.  Hope you get out and enjoy our streets this spring!

 

safe travels on Davis

Tuesday, December 1st, 2015

safe travels on Davis

Viva is rolling on Davis Drive and drivers are getting used to new traffic movements, so if you’re walking, it’s important to be aware of everything that’s happening when you cross the street.

The most important thing to do as a pedestrian on Davis Drive is to cross at the traffic signals. It may seem tempting to cross mid-block, or walk or stand in the rapidway lanes, but drivers aren’t expecting to see you there.

Getting to and from the hospital from across Davis has always been a challenge, so the intersection in front of Southlake provides an additional way to cross safely. Crossing near the hospital without using the crosswalk is particularly risky, because drivers coming over the hill may not be able to stop quickly.

The next important thing to remember is to press the walk button on the corner of the intersection – the walk signal only happens if you press the button. If you need a little extra time to cross, you can stop in the middle at Parkside/Longford, Main Street or Southlake and press the walk button again to cross the second half of the road.

With spacious, tree-lined sidewalks and tree planters acting as a buffer between traffic and pedestrians, the new sidewalks on Davis Drive are a safe and attractive place to be. It’s getting dark earlier this time of year though, and soon we’ll see snow falling on roads and sidewalks. It’s important to stay alert and make sure drivers see you as you cross the street on your commute, and as you shop and dine along Davis this season.

 

vivastations >> built for comfort and safety

Wednesday, November 11th, 2015

vivastation safety and comfort

We’ve taken every possible step to make the vivastations on the new Davis Drive rapidway feel like a safe haven, especially considering the stations are located in the middle of a busy roadway.

While you wait for transit, you can take comfort in the fact that you are well protected from the elements and adjacent traffic, and able to get help easily if you need it.

safety starts with design

The new vivastations include a variety of safety features, and are designed with transparency and good lighting in mind – two key principles of CPTED [Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design]. Stations have a concrete barrier wall along the traffic side, and a steel and glass guardrail beyond the glass canopy. The glass is impact-resistant with an interior film that prevents shattering [similar to a windshield] and provides UV sun protection.

call buttons are crucial

In the case of an emergency, an Emergency Call Button is clearly marked inside the glass enclosure. Its speaker provides immediate two-way contact between the caller and YRT operators. Call audio is recorded and time-stamped, as is the video automatically captured by the closest of three security cameras when the button is pushed. When the button is pushed, blue strobe lights on the Variable Message Sign [VMS] and the button are triggered to indicate to passing emergency services that assistance is needed, and transit staff will dispatch emergency services if needed.

safety is personal too

As much as we’ve designed vivastations to be safe, safety is also in the hands of those driving and walking on Davis Drive. While many drivers are now accustomed to making U-turns, but for others, it’s new. Drivers and pedestrians should both stay alert, and keep an eye out for one another, especially in intersections – and especially in fall and winter when daylight is in short supply.

two-stage crossings have rest spots

Because intersections were widened, a two-stage crossing at crosswalks is recommended for pedestrians. There are waiting areas in the middle of the crosswalk, where pedestrians can press the “walk” button and wait for the next signal.

Safety features are one of those things that are only top of mind when they’re needed. We hope that you always keep them in mind. That way you can rest assured that your rapidway trip will be a safe haven.